Architects - Ontario Heritage Trust

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Architects


  • 1 A. Stuart Allaster

    1 record(s) found

  • 2 A.A. Lasko

    2 record(s) found

  • 3 A.J. Russell, H.J. Powell

    1 record(s) found

  • 4 A.J. Stap

    1 record(s) found

  • 5 A.R. Holmes

    1 record(s) found

  • 6 A.S. Allaster

    1 record(s) found

  • 7 Adam Harvey

    1 record(s) found

  • 8 Albert Harvey Hills

    2 record(s) found

  • 9 Albert Jordan

    1 record(s) found

  • 10 Albert Lothian

    1 record(s) found

  • 11 Alexander Cowper Hutchinson

    1 record(s) found

  • 12 Alfred Chapman

    Alfred Chapman was born in Toronto and apprenticed with architect Beaumont Jarvis (1864-1948) prior to attending the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, where he graduated in 1902. After working in New York City, Chapman returned to Toronto and formed a partnership with Robert B. McGiffin. The partnership designed a number of Carnegie libraries, including: Dundas (1909); Barrie (1915); and Toronto’s Dovercourt Branch (Toronto, 1913). They also designed Knox College (Toronto, 1912-15) and Rosedale Presbyterian (Toronto, 1909). The partnership dissolved in 1919 and Chapman joined with engineer J. Morrow Oxley (1883-1957). Their most well-known building is the art deco-designed Holy Blossom Temple (Toronto, 1938). The partnership of Chapman & Oxley was responsible for many other important buildings, including an addition to the Royal Ontario Museum (Toronto, 1932) and the Harbour Commission Building (Toronto, 1919). Chapman was a fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada and a fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects.

    1 record(s) found

  • 13 Alfred M. Calderon

    1 record(s) found

  • 14 Alfred Varnell Brunel

    1 record(s) found

  • 15 Alfredas Kupavicius

    1 record(s) found

  • 16 Amos W. Cron and William Laing

    1 record(s) found

  • 17 Andrew Sharp

    2 record(s) found

  • 18 Archibald Fraser

    1 record(s) found

  • 19 Arthur J. Wills

    1 record(s) found

  • 20 Arthur Richard Denison

    1 record(s) found

  • 21 Arthur W. Holmes

    4 record(s) found

  • 22 Arthur William Holmes

    6 record(s) found

  • 23 Augustus Laver

    1 record(s) found

  • 24 B. Bilson

    1 record(s) found

  • 25 Band, Burrit and Meredith

    1 record(s) found

  • 26 Basil Hall

    Based in Hamilton, Ontario

    1 record(s) found

  • 27 Benjamin Blonde

    1 record(s) found

  • 28 Benjamin Swartz

    1 record(s) found

  • 29 Bishop Alexander Macdonell

    1 record(s) found

  • 30 Brown and Sons

    1 record(s) found

  • 31 Bruce Brown

    1 record(s) found

  • 32 Bruce Brown & Brisley

    1 record(s) found

  • 33 Burke and Horwood

    J.C.B. Horwood (1864-1938) was born in Quidi Vidi, Newfoundland. His family moved to Toronto when he was four. Horwood attended the Ryerson School, Jarvis Street Collegiate Institute and the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Science. In 1882, he joined Langley, Langley & Burke until 1890 when he moved to New York and worked as a draftsman at a number of architectural firms. In 1894, he returned to Toronto and entered into a partnership with Edmund Burke (1850-1919). Burke and Horwood's first important commission was the rebuilding of the Robert Simpson store in Toronto. Burke had designed the original store in 1894, but it burned down within weeks of its opening. Horwood had experienced advanced building methods in New York, and Simpson hired the partnership to design a fireproof store in 1895-96. This firm also designed a number of non-conformist churches, including: King Street East Methodist (Toronto, 1902); Memorial Baptist (Toronto, 1896-97); King Street Baptist (Cambridge, 1905); and Fourth Avenue Baptist (Ottawa, 1904). The firm was renamed Horwood and White in 1919 after Burke's death; it existed under that name until 1969. The practice was carried on by Horwood’s son Eric who, in 1979, donated over a century's worth of architectural drawings to the Archives of Ontario.

    4 record(s) found

  • 34 Burke, Horwood & White

    3 record(s) found

  • 35 Canon Georges Bouillon

    2 record(s) found

  • 36 Cecil Burgess

    1 record(s) found

  • 37 Chapman & McGiffin

    3 record(s) found

  • 38 Charles Albert Walton

    1 record(s) found

  • 39 Charles Albert Walton and David Roberts

    1 record(s) found

  • 40 Charles Brodeur

    1 record(s) found

  • 41 Charles F. Cox

    1 record(s) found

  • 42 Charles Frederick Wagner

    2 record(s) found

  • 43 Charles Hartnoll Bishop

    1 record(s) found

  • 44 Charles Herbert Acton Bond

    1 record(s) found

  • 45 Charles J. Gibson

    6 record(s) found

  • 46 Charles MacKay Willmot

    1 record(s) found

  • 47 Charles McCarthy

    2 record(s) found

  • 48 Charles Mills

    1 record(s) found

  • 49 Charles Moogk

    1 record(s) found

  • 50 Colin McDrewitt

    1 record(s) found

  • 51 Cooper

    1 record(s) found

  • 52 Cram, Goodhue & Ferguson

    1 record(s) found

  • 53 Cumberland & Ridout

    2 record(s) found

  • 54 Cumberland & Storm

    1 record(s) found

  • 55 D. Winter

    1 record(s) found

  • 56 Darling & Curry

    1 record(s) found

  • 57 Darling & Pearson

    John Andrew Pearson (1867-1940) was born in Chesterfield, England and came to Toronto in 1888. In 1890, Pearson began working for Henry Sproatt (1866-1934). By 1892-93, he was working for the firm of Darling, Curry & Sproatt. In 1893, Curry departed, leaving the firm as Darling, Sproatt & Pearson, which became Darling & Pearson, one of the Canada's leading commercial architectural firms at the turn of the century. Darling & Pearson were best known for their bank designs, most notably the Canadian Bank of Commerce (Toronto, 1929-31) – the tallest building in the Commonwealth at the time it was completed. R.S. McLaughlin commissioned Darling & Pearson to design Parkwood (Oshawa, 1916), now a National Historic Site, including the main house, stable, gatehouse and greenhouses. Church designs included St. Andrew's Presbyterian (Darling, Sproatt & Pearson, Belleville, 1895) and Glenview Presbyterian (Darling & Pearson, Toronto, 1931). In 1916, Pearson and J. Omer Marchand were selected to redesign the Centre Block of Canada’s Parliament Buildings (Ottawa, 1859-66). The Centre Block was destroyed in a fire in January 1916.

    1 record(s) found

  • 58 Darling, Sproat & Pearson

    1 record(s) found

  • 59 David Gunn Baxter

    1 record(s) found

  • 60 David John Cameron

    5 record(s) found

  • 61 David Murray

    1 record(s) found

  • 62 Dick & Wickson

    1 record(s) found

  • 63 Donald Buttress

    1 record(s) found

  • 64 Douglas Edwin Kertland

    1 record(s) found

  • 65 Dunlop Matsui

    1 record(s) found

  • 66 E.S. Walker

    1 record(s) found

  • 67 Eberhard Zeidler

    1 record(s) found

  • 68 Eden Smith

    Eden Smith was born in Birmingham, England. While studying art and architecture in Birmingham, Smith was exposed to the Arts and Crafts style. He immigrated to Canada in 1885, first to Manitoba and then to Toronto in 1887. He opened an architectural office in 1891, where he designed a large number of houses, churches and public buildings. Important ecclesiastical designs include: St. John the Evangelist Anglican (Toronto, 1892, now demolished); St. Thomas Anglican (Toronto, 1892); and St. George’s Memorial (Oshawa, 1922). Smith is most noted for introducing the Arts and Crafts style to Canada. He designed several public libraries, all of which opened in 1916, as well as a large number of Arts-and-Craft-style homes in Toronto.

    4 record(s) found

  • 69 Edmund Burke

    Edmund Burke was born in Toronto where he was educated at Jesse Ketchum School and Upper Canada College. From 1865-72, he was an apprentice to his uncle, architect Henry Langley (1836-1907). In 1873, Henry Langley, his brother Edward (a builder) and Edmund Burke formed the partnership of Langley, Langley & Burke. Following the retirement of Edward, the partnership of Langley & Burke continued until Edmund left in 1892. Langley & Burke obtained a number of important church commissions, including Sherbourne Street Methodist (now St. Luke’s United, Toronto, 1886-87) and Trinity Methodist (now Trinity-St. Paul’s United, Toronto, 1887-89). From 1895-1908, he was in the partnership of Burke & Horwood, which also completed a number of church designs, including: Memorial Baptist (Toronto, 1896-97); Fourth Avenue Baptist (Ottawa, 1904, now Ukrainian Baptist); and King Street Baptist (Cambridge, 1905). The partnership of Burke, Horwood & White was an extremely successful firm that designed, among other buildings, the Hudson Bay Company’s flagship stores in Western Canada, using modern building technology to create some of the country’s first skyscrapers. Burke was a founding member the Architectural Guild of Toronto (1887), the Ontario Association of Architects (1899) and the Royal Architectural Institute in Canada (1908).

    3 record(s) found

  • 70 Edward James (E.J.) Lennox

    E.J. Lennox was born in Toronto where he attended architectural drawing classes at the Mechanics’ Institute, after which he studied in the office of William Irving for five years. He founded the firm of Lennox and McGraw, which dissolved in 1882. Important Lennox buildings include: Erskine Presbyterian Church (Toronto, 1879); Bond Street Congregational Church (Toronto, 1879); and Bloor Street Baptist (Toronto, 1884). Perhaps his most famous design is Sir Henry Pellet’s Casa Loma (Toronto, 1909-13). Lennox is most noted for his use of the Richardsonian Romanesque style, which is best seen in Toronto’s Old City Hall (1887-89), the Toronto Athletic Club (1890) and the west wing of Ontario's legislative building at Queen's Park (Toronto, 1909). He also designed in other architectural styles popular during his time as a practising architect, including Edwardian Classicism, Victorian Eclectic and Beaux-Arts, the latter of which can be seen in the Bank of Toronto building (Toronto, 1905) on Yonge Street.

    2 record(s) found

  • 71 Edwin Ware

    2 record(s) found

  • 72 Ellis & Connery

    1 record(s) found

  • 73 F. Thomas

    1 record(s) found

  • 74 F.C. Law

    1 record(s) found

  • 75 Father Corriveau

    1 record(s) found

  • 76 Father John M. Filion

    1 record(s) found

  • 77 Father Paquin

    1 record(s) found

  • 78 Father Philip Ruh

    1 record(s) found

  • 79 Francis Bruce Brown

    1 record(s) found

  • 80 Francis Conroy Sullivan

    1 record(s) found

  • 81 Francis Spence Baker

    1 record(s) found

  • 82 Frank A. White

    1 record(s) found

  • 83 Frank Burcher

    1 record(s) found

  • 84 Frank Darling

    Frank Darling was born in Scarborough Township, Canada West (Ontario). He was educated at Upper Canada College and Trinity College, both in Toronto. He studied briefly at the office of Thomas Gundry and Henry Langley, as well as in London, England with architect George Edmund Street (1824-81). Darling had partnerships with Henry Macdougall, Samuel Curry (1854-1942), Henry Sporatt (1866-1934) and John Pearson (1867-1940). Darling began private practice in Toronto in 1873 when he entered into partnership with Henry Macdougall. He had many commissions from Toronto Anglican congregations, including: St. Matthias (Toronto, 1873-74); St. Thomas (Toronto, 1874, demolished); St. Luke (Toronto, 1881, demolished); and St. Mary Magdalene Anglo-Catholic Church (Toronto, 1892). He also designed a number of banks, including the Bank of Montreal (Toronto, 1885, now the Hockey Hall of Fame) and dozens of buildings for the Bank of Commerce, which included designs for Winnipeg, Montreal and Vancouver. As one of Toronto’s greatest promoters of the Beaux-Arts style, Darling was the first honorary President of the Toronto Beaux-Arts Club. In 1915, he became the only Canadian designer to receive the Gold Medal from the Royal Institute of British Architects.

    2 record(s) found

  • 85 Frank Wills

    1 record(s) found

  • 86 Franklin Thomas Lent

    1 record(s) found

  • 87 Fred K. Roman

    1 record(s) found

  • 88 Frederic W. Cumberland

    Fredrick W. Cumberland was born in London, England. He was educated at King’s College, Cambridge and studied at the office of Sir Charles Barry (1795-1860), architect of the Houses of Parliament at Westminster. Cumberland immigrated to Canada in 1847 where he was appointed engineer for the County of York. In 1852, he formed a partnership with W.G. Storm (1826-92), which lasted until 1865. One of the partnership’s best-known works – University College (Toronto, 1856-59) – is characterized by irregular massing, contrasting materials and skilful stone-carving. Some of his notable designs include: County of York Magistrates’ Court (Toronto, 1852); St. James Anglican Cathedral (Toronto, 1850-53); St James-the-Less (Toronto, 1855-57); and the Church of the Ascension (Hamilton, 1850-51). Cumberland became increasingly involved in railway construction and was employed as their chief engineer and, after 1858, as managing director of the Canadian Northern Railway.

  • 89 Frederick Benjamin James

    1 record(s) found

  • 90 Frederick Charles Kortum

    1 record(s) found

  • 91 Frederick J. Bird

    1 record(s) found

  • 92 G.B. Colthurst

    1 record(s) found

  • 93 G.D. Xiggoros

    1 record(s) found

  • 94 G.K. & E. Radford

    1 record(s) found

  • 95 G.M. Miller & Co.

    1 record(s) found

  • 96 George Browne

    George Browne was born in Belfast, Ireland. He received architectural training in Dublin under the supervision of his architect father. Browne arrived in Quebec c. 1830 and Kingston in 1841, where he worked as a government architect. He created buildings that were nationalistic in ambition – Kingston City Hall (1842-44) was one of his greatest. The majority of his buildings were constructed with Kingston grey limestone, including St. Andrew’s Manse (1841) and a branch of the Bank of Montreal (1844). Browne left Kingston for Montreal in 1844.

  • 97 George Burgess

    1 record(s) found

  • 98 George Clavet

    1 record(s) found

  • 99 George Durand

    George Durand entered Peel’s Art School in London, Canada West (Ontario) at the age of 14. In the 1860s, he trained with architect William Robinson (1812-94). After completing his apprenticeship, Durand was hired as Clerk of Works for the Thomas Fuller-designed New York State Capitol building in Albany. The project encountered much criticism because of its opulence and budget, and Fuller and his staff were all fired and replaced. Durand returned to London and became one of the leading architects of the era in southwestern Ontario. Durand joined William Robinson and Thomas Henry Tracy (1848-1925) in 1878; by 1880, he and Tracy were partners after the retirement of Robinson. Churches attributed to Tracy & Durand include: Talbot Street Baptist (London, 1881-82, now First Christian Reformed Church); Christ Church Anglican (Delaware, 1885); and Carmel Presbyterian (Hensall, 1886-87, now Hensall Presbyterian). Churches attributed as the sole work of Durand include Knox Presbyterian (Listowel, 1887-88) and Colborne Street Methodist (London, 1888-89, now United). Durand also designed Upper Canada College (Toronto, completed 1889, demolished) and Petrolia Town Hall (Petrolia, 1887-89, now Victoria Hall). After Durand’s death, the firm’s projects were completed by Fred Henry (1865-1929), who joined with Durand’s former colleague, John M. Moore (1857-1930) to carry on the practice.

    3 record(s) found

  • 100 George Martel Miller

    1 record(s) found

  • 101 George Mitchell

    1 record(s) found

  • 102 George Tonks

    1 record(s) found

  • 103 George Waddell

    3 record(s) found

  • 104 George William Hall

    2 record(s) found

  • 105 George Yamasaki and Roy Matsui

    1 record(s) found

  • 106 Georges-Émile Tanquay

    1 record(s) found

  • 107 Gerald Querdnau

    1 record(s) found

  • 108 Gordon & Helliwell

    Henry Bauld Gordon (1854-1951) was born in Toronto and went on to train with Henry Langley (1836-1907). In 1877, he began his own architectural practice and, in 1879, formed a successful partnership with Grant Helliwell (1855-1953). They designed the Orillia Presbyterian Church (Orillia, 1888), Church of the Messiah (Toronto, 1891) and the Presbyterian Church of the Covenant (Toronto, 1899, now the International Society of Krishna Consciousness). Gordon was a member of the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts and served twice (1896 and 1908) as president of the Ontario Association of Architects.

    11 record(s) found

  • 109 Gordon Sinclair Adamson

    1 record(s) found

  • 110 Gordon William Lloyd

    3 record(s) found

  • 111 Gregg & Gregg

    3 record(s) found

  • 112 Gundry & Langley

    Thomas Gundry was born in England where he trained as an architect. It was in Toronto, however, that he established his architectural career. In 1862, William Hay (1818-88) and Gundry were briefly in partnership before Hay left Toronto. Hay left his practice to Gundry and his young apprentice Henry Langley (1836-1907), a partnership that lasted until Gundry’s death in 1869. Within the firm, Gundry was responsible for the business operations while Langley undertook the drafting and primary design. Important church designs by the firm of Gundry and Langley include: St. Peter’s Anglican Church (Toronto, 1864-65); Alexander Street Baptist Church (Toronto, 1866, demolished); St. Thomas' Anglican (Brooklin, 1869-1870); St. Patrick’s Roman Catholic (now Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Toronto, 1869-70); and St. James' Anglican (Stratford, 1870).

    9 record(s) found

  • 113 H. Holgate and H. Lennox

    1 record(s) found

  • 114 H.R. Halton

    1 record(s) found

  • 115 Hall

    1 record(s) found

  • 116 Hanks, Irwin and Pearson

    1 record(s) found

  • 117 Harold Carter

    1 record(s) found

  • 118 Harry Angus

    1 record(s) found

  • 119 Harry J. Powell

    2 record(s) found

  • 120 Harry Kohl

    1 record(s) found

  • 121 Hazelgrove & Lithwick

    2 record(s) found

  • 122 Henry Blacker

    2 record(s) found

  • 123 Henry Bowyer Lane

    Henry Bowyer Lane was born in London, England. He studied architecture at the Royal Academy School, was a pupil of William Inwood (c.1771-1843) and had an active practice in London prior to immigrating to Upper Canada in 1840. He went first to Cobourg, then Toronto where he had a practice from 1842-47. His designs were largely for Toronto, including the City Hall and Market (1844 – the façade remains) and major additions to Osgoode Hall (1844). Important ecclesiastical commissions included Little Trinity Anglican (1843), St. George the Martyr Anglican (1844 – the tower remains) and Holy Trinity Anglican (1846). After much success in Toronto, Lane returned to England in 1847. Although Lane’s time in Toronto was brief, he made significant contributions to the mid-19th-century architecture of the city.

    3 record(s) found

  • 124 Henry J. Chown

    1 record(s) found

  • 125 Henry Langley

    Henry Langley was born in Toronto and was educated at the Toronto Academy. At 17, he began a seven-year apprenticeship with William Hay, a Scottish-born architect who specialized in the Gothic Revival style. From 1862-69, Langley was in partnership with Thomas Gundry (d. 1869). In 1873, Henry Langley, his brother Edward (a builder) and Edmund Burke (1850-1919) formed the partnership of Langley, Langley and Burke. Jarvis Street Baptist Church (1874-75) was the firm’s first important commission, and was one of the earliest church amphitheatres designed in Ontario. Following the retirement of Edward, Henry and Edmund continued until 1892. Langley undertook commissions for residential, commercial and public structures, but it is for his churches that Langley is most remembered. Important Langley commissions include: Metropolitan Methodist, now United Church (Langley, Toronto, 1872 – the interior was destroyed by fire in 1928); St. George’s Anglican (Langley, Guelph, 1873); and Simcoe St. Methodist Church (Gundry & Langley, Oshawa, 1867). In total, he designed 70 churches across the province. Langley was a prominent figure in the development of the architectural profession in Ontario.

    16 record(s) found

  • 126 Henry Simpson

    1 record(s) found

  • 127 Henry Sproatt

    Henry Sproatt was born in Toronto. He attended Collingwood Collegiate Institute and trained as an architect under Arthur Richard Denison (1857-1924). He also apprenticed in New York City from 1886-88. In the early 1890s, he was partner in the firm of Darling, Curry, Sproatt & Pearson. Sproatt left the firm in 1899 and entered into a partnership with Ernest Rolph (1871-1958), also based in Toronto. The partnership of Sproatt & Rolph was responsible for numerous institutional, commercial and residential buildings in Toronto. Designs by Sproatt included: Hart House (Sproatt & Rolph, Toronto, completed 1919); the Memorial Tower at University of Toronto (Sproatt & Rolph, Toronto, 1926); College Park (with Ross & Macdonald, Toronto, 1928-30); and the National Club (Curry, Sproatt & Rolph, Toronto, 1906). Sproatt was elected fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects. Important church designs include and Knox Presbyterian Church (Ottawa, 1932). His firm was continued by his son, Charles Beverly Sproatt, until 1970.

    1 record(s) found

  • 128 Hoffman Kribs

    1 record(s) found

  • 129 Hutchison Clark

    1 record(s) found

  • 130 I. Watts

    1 record(s) found

  • 131 Irving Grossman

    2 record(s) found

  • 132 J. Boyde

    4 record(s) found

  • 133 J. David McAuley

    6 record(s) found

  • 134 J. Francis Brown

    1 record(s) found

  • 135 J. Stuart Cauley

    1 record(s) found

  • 136 J.A. Ellise

    2 record(s) found

  • 137 J.A. MacKenzie

    1 record(s) found

  • 138 J.L. Wilson and W.C. Craddock

    1 record(s) found

  • 139 J.P. Johnson

    This architect worked out of Bowmanville.

    1 record(s) found

  • 140 J.P. Thomson

    2 record(s) found

  • 141 James (Jim) William Strutt

    1 record(s) found

  • 142 James and Lalor

    1 record(s) found

  • 143 James Anderson

    1 record(s) found

  • 144 James Augustus Ellis

    1 record(s) found

  • 145 James Balfour

    1 record(s) found

  • 146 James Carlisle Pennington

    8 record(s) found

  • 147 James Chevette

    1 record(s) found

  • 148 James Harold Haffa Jr.

    2 record(s) found

  • 149 James L . Wilson

    2 record(s) found

  • 150 James Mather

    1 record(s) found

  • 151 James Michael Cowan

    1 record(s) found

  • 152 James P. Johnston

    2 record(s) found

  • 153 James Scott

    1 record(s) found

  • 154 James Smith

    James Avon Smith was born in Macduff, Banfshire, Scotland. He emigrated to Canada in 1851 and apprenticed with William Thomas (c. 1799-1860). He then went on, in 1870, to form a partnership with his former student, John Gemmell (1851-1915). The firm of Smith & Gemmell designed many of Toronto’s churches, including: Berkeley Street Wesleyan Methodist Church (Toronto, 1871, now an entertainment venue); Church of the Redeemer (Toronto, 1878); St. Paul’s Methodist, now United (Toronto, 1886); Immanuel Baptist Church (Toronto, 1889, demolished); and Dublin Street United Church (Guelph, 1874-76).

    2 record(s) found

  • 155 James Watson Balharrie

    1 record(s) found

  • 156 James Wilson

    1 record(s) found

  • 157 James Wilson Gray

    James Wilson Gray was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, where he also apprenticed as an architect. He emigrated to Toronto in 1885, forming a partnership in 1886 with Alan Macdougall. In 1887, he opened his own practice. Gray designed Knox Presbyterian (Toronto, 1907-09) and Riverdale Presbyterian (Toronto, ca. 1912, now The Glebe Lofts).

    2 record(s) found

  • 158 Jean-François Cannon

    1 record(s) found

  • 159 John Anthony

    1 record(s) found

  • 160 John B. Parkin

    John B. Parkin was born in Toronto and studied architecture at the University of Toronto. In 1935, he began working in the office of Howard and Souster in London, England. In 1937, he returned to Canada and began a practice in Toronto, eventually forming the partnership of John B. Parkin Associates. Parkin’s firm followed the International style; they were leaders in the field of modern architecture. Parkin designed the Central Christadelphian Church (Toronto, 1949), one of the earliest Modernist buildings in the city. The building won a Massey Medal in architecture in 1950. He also designed the Salvation Army National Headquarters and Temple (Toronto, 1956, demolished). Other significant projects include: the Ontario Association of Architects Headquarters (Toronto, 1953-54); Bata Shoe Headquarters (Toronto, 1965, demolished); the Fabergé Factory (Etobicoke); and the Ottawa Train Station (Ottawa, 1966, now the Via Rail Station).

    1 record(s) found

  • 161 John Belcher

    7 record(s) found

  • 162 John Chrishom

    1 record(s) found

  • 163 John Day

    1 record(s) found

  • 164 John Edward Hoare Jr.

    1 record(s) found

  • 165 John George Howard

    John George Howard was born as John Corby in Hertfordshire, England, where he attended boarding school. At age 15, he joined the navy. He acquired skills in navigation, geometry and marine surveying and began a career in land surveying, engineering and architecture after leaving the navy. He worked for a number of architects – his uncle at Kensington Cross, London architects John Grayson and William Ford, and a firm of contracting architects in Maidstone. Around 1833, he immigrated to York (Toronto) in Upper Canada where he was appointed city surveyor. He became an important teacher, political figure and naturalist; he was one of the first professional architects to settle in Toronto. From 1833-56, Howard was a drawing instructor at Upper Canada College and, from 1853-57, he was a Justice of the Peace. His best-known religious buildings were Holy Trinity Anglican (Chippawa, 1840), Christ Church Anglican (Tyendinaga, 1843) and St. John's Anglican York Mills (Toronto, 1843). He also laid out St. James Cemetery on Parliament Street (Toronto). In 1873, Howard and his wife Jemima Frances Meikle deeded High Park to the City of Toronto. His home – Colborne Lodge, which Howard designed in 1836 – was also willed to the city.

    5 record(s) found

  • 166 John Gibb Morton

    2 record(s) found

  • 167 John H. Young

    1 record(s) found

  • 168 John Lyle

    John Lyle was born in Ireland. He emigrated, with his parents, to Ontario in 1878. Lyle spent his childhood in Hamilton where he attended the Hamilton School of Art. He trained as an architect at the Yale School of the Arts and the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, which he entered in 1894. Lyle spent a number of years working in New York City for several large architectural firms. On his return to Canada in 1906, he became a key figure in the dissemination of Beaux-Arts ideals to the architectural profession. He gave lectures at the University of Toronto on the style and designed some of that city’s great Beaux-Arts buildings, such as Union Station (1914-21) and the Royal Alexandra Theatre (Toronto, 1906-07). Lyle’s Runnymede Public Library (Toronto, 1929) combines a uniquely Canadian architecture with the use of local materials, a French-Canadian design influence and First Nation imagery. He also designed Central Presbyterian Church (Hamilton, 1907-08). Lyle was a leader in Toronto’s City Beautiful movement. He also developed visionary designs for Toronto's Civic Improvement League.

    1 record(s) found

  • 169 John Mackenzie Moore

    2 record(s) found

  • 170 John Maxwell

    1 record(s) found

  • 171 John Power

    1 record(s) found

  • 172 John Pritchard MacLaren

    2 record(s) found

  • 173 John R. Bowes

    1 record(s) found

  • 174 John Stokes

    1 record(s) found

  • 175 John Thomas Stokes

    2 record(s) found

  • 176 John Turner

    4 record(s) found

  • 177 John William Hurrell Watts

    3 record(s) found

  • 178 John Wilson Siddall

    2 record(s) found

  • 179 Johnson & McWhinnie

    1 record(s) found

  • 180 Johnson Rae

    1 record(s) found

  • 181 Joseph Connolly

    Joseph Connolly was born in Limerick, Ireland. He received his professional training in Dublin under J.J. McCarthy (1817-81) – a leading 19th-century Catholic Church architect who specialized in the Gothic Revival style. After settling in Toronto, Connolly practised alone until 1873 when he formed a partnership with Silas James, a land surveyor. By 1877, he had left the partnership and, in the 1880s, formed another with A.W. Holmes. This partnership lasted until Connolly's death in 1904. Although Connolly is credited with designing a number of secular buildings, it is his designs for religious structures – particularly those for the Roman Catholic Church – that are most remarkable. His Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception (Guelph, 1876) is designated as a National Historic Site. Other important churches include: James Street Baptist Church (Hamilton, 1879); St. Peter's Cathedral Basilica (London, 1880); St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Church (Toronto, 1885); and St. Paul’s Roman Catholic Basilica (Toronto, 1887).

    18 record(s) found

  • 182 Joseph Pierre Michel Lecourt

    1 record(s) found

  • 183 Joseph Savage

    1 record(s) found

  • 184 Joseph Scobell

    1 record(s) found

  • 185 Kaplan & Sprachman

    1 record(s) found

  • 186 Karl Briestensky

    1 record(s) found

  • 187 Karl H. Kruschen

    1 record(s) found

  • 188 Kastler & Hunter

    1 record(s) found

  • 189 King McCord Arnoldi

    1 record(s) found

  • 190 Kivas Tully

    Kivas Tully was born in Garryvacum, Ireland. He attended the Royal Naval School in London and received four years of professional training under W.H. Owen, an architect and civil engineer in Limerick. In 1844, Tully immigrated to Upper Canada. One of his earliest works was the Bank of Montreal building (Toronto, 1845, now demolished) at Yonge and Front streets. Tully’s best-known work is Victoria Hall (Cobourg, 1856-60). Important ecclesiastical commissions include: St. John’s Anglican (Thorold, 1852); Christ Church Anglican (Lakefield, 1853); and St. Anne’s Anglican (Brockton, 1862). Following Confederation, Tully joined the new Ontario Department of Public Works where he was appointed the department’s architect, engineer and chief officer. He served twice on Toronto City Council (1852 and 1859) and, in 1853, he was appointed engineer for the Toronto Harbour Trust, a post he would hold until his death.

    3 record(s) found

  • 191 Knox & Elliot

    2 record(s) found

  • 192 L.G. Howard & Benjamin Chaffey Jr.

    1 record(s) found

  • 193 Langley & Burke

    8 record(s) found

  • 194 Langley & Langley

    1 record(s) found

  • 195 Langley, Langley & Burke

    4 record(s) found

  • 196 Leonard Huget

    1 record(s) found

  • 197 Lipson and Dashkin

    1 record(s) found

  • 198 M. Kingsley Lockwood

    1 record(s) found

  • 199 Mallory & Son

    2 record(s) found

  • 200 Mancel Willmot

    2 record(s) found

  • 201 Marani, Morris and Allen

    1 record(s) found

  • 202 Marshall Benjamin Aylesworth

    5 record(s) found

  • 203 Matthew Bell

    1 record(s) found

  • 204 McBride & Jones

    1 record(s) found

  • 205 McBridge

    1 record(s) found

  • 206 Michael Bach

    1 record(s) found

  • 207 Milton Earl Beebe

    2 record(s) found

  • 208 Moore & Henry

    4 record(s) found

  • 209 Moses Chamberlain Edey

    1 record(s) found

  • 210 Murray and Murray

    1 record(s) found

  • 211 Murray Brown

    1 record(s) found

  • 212 Murray Ross

    1 record(s) found

  • 213 Noffke, Morin & Sylvester

    2 record(s) found

  • 214 Pennington & Carter

    1 record(s) found

  • 215 Peter James O’Gorman

    1 record(s) found

  • 216 Pierre Légaré

    1 record(s) found

  • 217 Popvic

    1 record(s) found

  • 218 Radoslav Zuk

    2 record(s) found

  • 219 Raymond Moriyama

    1 record(s) found

  • 220 Rev. F.X. Granottier

    François Xavier Granottier was born in Val Fleury, Loire, France on October 5, 1836. He studied the classics and philosophy at the College in L'Argentiere. He also studied at the Grand Seminaries of Algiers (North Africa) and Viviers in France. Granottier was ordained a priest on May 18, 1862 and arrived in Canada three months later. Father Granottier built eight churches in the Grey-Bruce region, the largest being St. Mary of the Assumption (1871), which was modelled after the medieval parish church of his hometown in France. Some of his other churches included Irish Block in Meaford, Chatsworth, and Cape Croker. He died in Owen Sound, Ontario, on March 2, 1917.

    1 record(s) found

  • 221 Rev. Paul Antione DeSaunhac

    1 record(s) found

  • 222 Rev. Philip Ruh

    1 record(s) found

  • 223 Richard Cunningham Windeyer

    6 record(s) found

  • 224 Robert Lamb

    1 record(s) found

  • 225 Robert Langlois

    1 record(s) found

  • 226 Robert Thomas Elliot

    1 record(s) found

  • 227 Robert William Gambier Bousfield

    1 record(s) found

  • 228 Roman Dumyn

    1 record(s) found

  • 229 Roman Stankiewicz

    1 record(s) found

  • 230 S. Bagga

    1 record(s) found

  • 231 S.R. Badgley

    6 record(s) found

  • 232 Salter and Allison

    1 record(s) found

  • 233 Scott & Co. Architects

    1 record(s) found

  • 234 Senecal & Papineau

    1 record(s) found

  • 235 Shea & Masson

    1 record(s) found

  • 236 Sheppard & Masson

    George Y. Masson (c. 1895-1982) was born in Detroit, Michigan; he moved to Windsor, Ontario at a young age. Masson studied architecture at the University of Pennsylvania. He was in the firm of Nichols, Sheppard & Masson and later, Sheppard, Masson, Brand & Langlois. Masson and his firms contributed greatly to the architecture of the Windsor area, including: the Cenotaph (Windsor, 1924); the YMCA building (Windsor, 1925); and the Essex Golf Club and Country Club (LaSalle, c. 1928). Important religious designs include: Westminster United (Windsor, 1930); Church of the Ascension (Windsor, 1907-27); and St. Mary’s Anglican Parish Hall (Windsor, 1950). Masson served in 1956 as president of the Ontario Association of Architects. Masson also served overseas in both the First and Second World Wars where he was a Commanding Officer of The Essex Armoured Regiment.

    3 record(s) found

  • 237 Sheridan College of Design students

    St. Hilda's Anglican Church in Oakville was designed and built in 1970 by students and staff from the Sheridan College of Design.

    1 record(s) found

  • 238 Sidney R. Badgley

    1 record(s) found

  • 239 Silas H. Weekes

    1 record(s) found

  • 240 Sir Giles Gilbert Scott

    1 record(s) found

  • 241 Smith & Gemmell

    8 record(s) found

  • 242 Solon Spencer Bemen

    1 record(s) found

  • 243 Spier & Rohns

    Frederick H. Spier (1855-1931) and William C. Rohns (1856-51), both German-born and -trained architects, formed an architectural practice in Detroit in 1884. The office specialized in railway station design across Canada and the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. They are also known for their institutional, commercial and religious buildings, which often exhibited the Beaux Arts tradition and Richardsonian Romanesque architectural styles. Religious commissions in Canada include St. Andrew's Presbyterian (Windsor) and the expansion of St. Paul's Anglican Cathedral (London).

    1 record(s) found

  • 244 Sproatt & Rolph

    2 record(s) found

  • 245 Steve Dudzinski

    1 record(s) found

  • 246 Stewart & Denison

    1 record(s) found

  • 247 Stewart & Witton

    1 record(s) found

  • 248 Stewart Thomson McPhie

    2 record(s) found

  • 249 Stinson and Hood

    2 record(s) found

  • 250 Strickland & Symons

    3 record(s) found

  • 251 T.T. George

    1 record(s) found

  • 252 Taylor & Taylor

    1 record(s) found

  • 253 Thomas Boughton

    1 record(s) found

  • 254 Thomas Christie

    1 record(s) found

  • 255 Thomas Connolly

    1 record(s) found

  • 256 Thomas Fuller

    Thomas Fuller was born in Bath, England, and emigrated to Toronto in 1857. Soon after his arrival, he set up an architectural firm with Chilion Jones (1835-1912), with whom he designed Canada’s Parliament Buildings (Ottawa, completed 1878; destroyed by fire in 1916). He was Chief Architect at the department of Public Works from 1881 to 1896, where he supervised the design of over 140 buildings across the country. It was through these designs that he defined the character of federal architecture in Canada. His small post offices became recognizable symbols of the federal government. From a religious architecture perspective, the firm specialized in Anglican church architecture in a Gothic revival style, including: St. Stephen-in-the-Fields (Toronto, 1858); St. Alban the Martyr Anglican (Ottawa, 1867-77); and St. John the Baptist Anglican (Lyn, 1858-69).

    3 record(s) found

  • 257 Thomas John Rutley

    3 record(s) found

  • 258 Thomas Raybould Wilks

    2 record(s) found

  • 259 Thomas Rogers

    1 record(s) found

  • 260 Thomas Seaton Scott

    1 record(s) found

  • 261 Thomas Young

    1 record(s) found

  • 262 Tracy & Durand

    1 record(s) found

  • 263 Unknown

    5248 record(s) found

  • 264 W. Carson Woods

    1 record(s) found

  • 265 W. Graeme Tompkins

    1 record(s) found

  • 266 Walter McKay

    1 record(s) found

  • 267 Walter Renison Lightborne Blackwell

    1 record(s) found

  • 268 Walter Stennett

    1 record(s) found

  • 269 Watt & Crane

    1 record(s) found

  • 270 Wickson & Gregg

    2 record(s) found

  • 271 William Alexander Langton

    1 record(s) found

  • 272 William Augustus Austin

    1 record(s) found

  • 273 William Blackwell

    2 record(s) found

  • 274 William Bryson Allan

    2 record(s) found

  • 275 William Coverdale

    William Coverdale was born in England. He arrived in Lower Canada (Quebec) c. 1810 and Kingston, Upper Canada (Ontario) in 1833. In 1834, he took over as the master builder for the ongoing construction of the Kingston Penitentiary, which he worked on for 14 years. He also designed and built a number of structures at the Rockwood Lunatic Asylum (Kingston, 1859-70). Both of these sites were built by convict labour. He served as City of Kingston architect from 1846-65. Important church designs include: Sydenham Street Methodist (Kingston, 1851, now United); St. Paul’s Anglican (Kingston, 1845); St. James’ Anglican (Kingston); and St. John’s Anglican (Kingston 1849-50).

    5 record(s) found

  • 276 William Ford Howland

    William Ford Howland was born in West Toronto and studied and trained at the firms Langley & Burke and Burke & Horwood. Howland also received experience in the architectural field in New York City. He returned to Toronto in 1904 and was involved in the process of reconstruction after the major fire that year, which destroyed much of the city’s downtown core. He and Charles Edward Langley (1870-1951) – son of Henry Langley – established the firm of Langley & Howland in 1907, after the death of Henry Langley. Langley & Howland continued until 1941, when the partners retired. Howland designed St. Anne’s Anglican (Toronto, 1908) in the Byzantine Revival style, a design and choice of style that is unique in Anglican church architecture in Canada.

    1 record(s) found

  • 277 William Frederick Rutley

    1 record(s) found

  • 278 William G. Storm

    William George Storm was born in England and emigrated to York (Toronto), Upper Canada (Ontario) in 1830. His early years in Canada are poorly documented, but he seems to have worked as a contractor. He was a pupil of William Thomas (c. 1799-1860) and he made several study trips to Europe. Storm was planning to move to California until he received an offer of employment in 1852 from the office of Frederick Cumberland (1820-81). This partnership lasted until 1863, when Storm began practising on his own. He designed several churches in Toronto, including: the Chapel of St. James-the-less (Toronto, 1858); Carlton Street Methodist Church (Toronto, 1874, demolished); and St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church (Toronto, 1874-76). He also designed the Ontario County Courthouse (Cumberland and Storm, Whitby, 1853) and Sackville Street Public School (Toronto, 1887). Storm was also the first president of the Ontario Association of Architects and a member of the Royal Canadian Academy.

    1 record(s) found

  • 279 William George Malcomson

    2 record(s) found

  • 280 William Hay

    William Hay was born in Scotland and received his architectural training from John Henderson of Edinburgh. In the 1840s, he joined the London office of architect George Gilbert Scott (1811-78), who sent him to Newfoundland to act as Clerk of Works on the Anglican Cathedral of St. John the Baptist. He arrived in Toronto in 1852, where he trained future architect Henry Langley (1836-1907). Hay became vice-president of the Mechanics Institute and secretary of the Association of Architects Civil Engineers and Provincial Surveyors of Canada. Important ecclesiological designs include: St. Basil’s Roman Catholic (Toronto, 1855); St. George’s Anglican (Pickering, 1856); St. George’s Anglican (Newcastle, 1857); and St. Andrews Presbyterian (Guelph, 1857). Hay left Toronto in about 1862 and turned his practice over to his partner Thomas Gundry and his formal pupil, Henry Langley. After spending brief periods in Halifax and Bermuda, Hay returned to Scotland by 1864.

    6 record(s) found

  • 281 William Henry Croker

    1 record(s) found

  • 282 William J. Ireland

    2 record(s) found

  • 283 William James Abra

    1 record(s) found

  • 284 William James Walsh

    1 record(s) found

  • 285 William Leith

    2 record(s) found

  • 286 William Merrill

    1 record(s) found

  • 287 William R. Gregg

    William R. Gregg was born in Belleville, Canada West (Ontario). He trained as an architect in the office of Smith and Gemmell from 1871-76. While he and his brother Alfred were in partnership for about 10 years around the turn of the 20th century, the majority of his career as an architect was spent in independent practice. Church commissions include: St. Andrew's Presbyterian (Thorold, 1883-84); Bloor Street United (Toronto, 1889); and Dovercourt-St.Paul's Presbyterian (Toronto, 1905).

    6 record(s) found

  • 288 William Rae

    1 record(s) found

  • 289 William Ridpath

    1 record(s) found

  • 290 William Robinson

    2 record(s) found

  • 291 William Thomas

    William Thomas was born in Stroud, Gloucestershire, England. He immigrated to Toronto in 1843 with his family. He designed 27 churches in Canada and emerged as the leading pre-Confederation architect. He designed St. Paul’s Anglican (London, 1844-46), St. Michael’s Roman Catholic Cathedral (Toronto, 1845-48) and the Unitarian Church on Jarvis Street (Toronto, 1854, now demolished). He also designed a number of public buildings, including: Kent County Court House (Chatham, 1848-49); St. Lawrence Hall (Toronto, 1850); and the Town Hall and Market (Guelph 1856-57). In 1857, Thomas brought two of his sons into the firm – William Tutin (1829-92) and Cyrus Pole (1833-1911) – and the firm’s name became William Thomas and Sons. In 1847, Thomas and John G. Howard (1803-90) established the Toronto Society of Arts. In 1859, he became President of the Association of Architects, Civil Engineers and Public Land Surveyors. By the end of his life, he had the largest architectural firm in Canada, designing in a variety of styles for various types of buildings. He is considered one of the founders of the Canadian architectural profession.

    5 record(s) found

  • 292 William Thomas & Henry Langley

    1 record(s) found

  • 293 William Tutin Thomas

    1 record(s) found

  • 294 Williams Brothers

    2 record(s) found

  • 295 Wyatt & Crane

    1 record(s) found

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